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He's So Fine The Chiffons Beatles George Harrison Court Case Piano Sheet Music

Item# POSTCARDFINDER26216

   
 

He's So Fine The Chiffons Beatles George Harrison Court Case Piano Sheet Music

Seller: Stephanie White, Apartment 104, Norfolk, UNITED KINGDOM     Log in to ask the seller a question

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Price: $16.99

Shipping/Handling charge in the U.S.: $5.95

Description:

*** Vintage collectors sheet music by The Chiffons and their 1962 chart hit "He's So Fine" on Bright Tango Music and Peter Maurice Publications which this is the rare first press in near mint condition and outstanding - you wont get better ***

From the WWB - This song became famous in a huge court case with George Harrison filing against The Chiffons (see below)...

On February 10, 1971, Bright Tunes Music Corporation filed suit alleging that the current George Harrison hit "My Sweet Lord" was a plagiarism of "He's So Fine". The case did not go to trial until February 1976 when the judge ruled on the liability portion of the suit in favor of Bright Tunes, determining that Harrison had committed "subconscious" plagiarism. The suit to determine damages was scheduled for November 1976 but delayed until February 1981, Harrison's onetime manager who had been his legal adviser in the first phase of the suit, had become the plaintiff by virtue of purchasing Bright Tunes. The final decision was that Harrison himself would purchase Bright Tunes from Klein for $587,000—the amount Klein had paid for the corporation—and although litigation continued for at least ten more years that decision was upheld. In 1975 the Chiffons would record a version of "My Sweet Lord", attempting to capitalize on the publicity generated by the lawsuit.